Saturday Market Recap

This past Saturday was the Old Country Fair in Ganado, complete with market, quilting contest, salsa contest, weenie dog races, and food trucks. It was so fun! You had the quilt shop’s customers, feed store’s customers, market’s customers, and highway traffic all coming together to make for the most successful market (for us) yet. Despite the heat, it was nearly perfect.

The booth saw yet another make-over:

 

Here are some of top selling and most loved pieces:

 

We have a lot to get done before September. Hope to see y’all there!

Steak Hooks

How to make steak flippers (or hooks, but I think “flippers” is more fun to say). If you don’t know what those are, keep reading!

 

This is one of my favorite things that we sell. I had nothing to do with it, either; it was all my dad! Steak flippers or turners are a tool used for flipping steak, as the name suggests. It’s just a long stick with a hook at the end- perfect for Labor Day down the road!

Steak Hooks

This is how my dad made it.

To make the flipper, he used a deer shed and- get this- an old hay rake. I think that’s awesome!

First thing he did was cleaned the rust off the rake. He did this by soaking it in vinegar and buffing off the excess, shining it up. Then he took it to his forge (he makes knives) to heat it up and bent it so that the hook would more sideways. While that cooled, he moved on to drill a hole in the base of the small deer shed to fit the rake into. He also drilled a hole in the pointy end of the shed to tie leather through, so that it could be hung when stored. Once that was done, he put the two together, twisting and whatnot so that they securely fit together.

 

And that’s it! Easy peasy, but not too speedy to put together (that attempt at rhyming is just disgusting).

 

Happy grilling, y’all!

 

~Hannah ❤

Updates

So much as been happening this summer! Here’s a brief post to catch everyone up!

New Things!

So one day, I had this idea that I got super excited about. You always see beautiful sketches and paintings of deer or cow skulls with flowers and pretty colors. I thought, “why not make it 3D?” So I did, and here’s the result:

I’m in love. It started out with just one, which I made for my own bedroom, and then I kinda went down the rabbit hole and made many. They’ll be up for grabs at the market Saturday! Also, follow us on Facebook and Instagram to see more new things.

Saturday’s Market

Wildflowers & Charolais will be at Ganado’s Old Country Fair on Saturday July 28 from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. It’s being held at 8938 HWY 59 N in Ganado, right next to Dairy Queen at Two Chicks Quilting and Top Hand Feed.

There will be a bunch of vendors, weenie dog races, a quilting contest, and a salsa contest, as well as sales going on in Top Hand Feed and Two Chicks Quilting. There is also a Christmas in July theme going on, so get festive!

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Etsy

I’ve been on Etsy for a while now selling digital products, but just last week expanded to include the little things, like cozies and scrubbies. Here’s a sampling of everything, but head to the shop to see the entire line up.

New Venture: Furniture Flipping!

I’ve decided to finally tackle something on my creative bucket list: flipping furniture. I’m in the process of flipping my first project (a small chest of drawers) and will post pictures when it’s all said and done. It’ll be for sale at the booth this Saturday if no one claims it beforehand!

 

Thank you everyone for following along and checking in today. See y’all Saturday! -Hannah at Wildflowers & Charolais

 

Johnson City: Texas Markets

This post, as well as a few others like this, profiles one of the many markets in Texas. I attend markets regularly as both vendor and customer, and there’s a reason for that: they are so fun!

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Nestled in the Hill Country, Johnson City Market Days is one of my favorites. It’s in downtown Johnson City, Texas, home of President Lyndon B. Johnson (whose boyhood home you can visit, if you’re a history buff), and falls every fourth weekend from March to October, with special dates during the holidays.

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The entire market is situated on one block, so it is pretty small. Despite its small size, the quality, diversity, and talent of the vendors more than make up for it.

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I sampled raw honey from a kind old man. There was a booth that sold unique stylish woodwork. There was jewelry, handmade knives, salsas… So many things that were handcrafted. I think that’s why I loved it so much: almost everything there was crafted by someone local. It wasn’t stocked with folks selling retail.

I ended up getting a hand-poured candle by Rustic Swank out of Marion, Texas. Their candles are made with “soy, dehydrated fruits, spices, an fragrance oils,” and all coloring, if used, is organic. I got the Lavender Fields scent, because I’m obsessed with lavender. It was $10, and they’ll refill it for half price.

 

A Little Note on the Deer Sheds

This post is going further in-depth about deer antler sheds: what they are and how to find them.

 

Last week, I wrote a piece on how I make jewelry holders made with deer antlers. I said to not freak out because no deer were harmed while getting the sheds, but many of you probably know that since they are sheds, meaning the deer naturally shed these antlers off. Still, I felt like it was necessary to post a short informative piece on what they are, why the exist, and how I get them.

 

Deer sheds are the antlers that a buck naturally shed during the early part of the year. It’s like losing your baby teeth; they fall out in one piece and a new set grows in. With antlers though, it happens every year. They lose last year’s antlers and grow in a new set.

 

These sheds, obviously, are just left out there. I mean it’s not like deer have an antler fairy that leaves them money under some bushes. They are just out and about and left for us to find. They come in all sizes and shapes, which opens so many creative doors.

 

To find them, you just have to look. We have found that buying them from someone who has done the treasure hunting to be much easier than walking around and looking ourselves. That isn’t to say we won’t or don’t, but for all intents and purposes, it’s better.

 

Hopefully this article was useful. I’m not an expert on this kind of thing, but I know that what we use in our jewelry holders, wreaths, and other pieces was not sawed off a deer or something. We just pick up after the deer. We are the antler fairies, but we don’t leave them anything.

 

If this article was a waste on you, I apologize! Next week’s content will definitely be a lot less concentrated. Thank you for reading anyway!

 

Until next time…

 

~Hannah ❤

Deer Antler Jewelry Holders

How we make jewelry holders.

CANVA Deer Antler Jewelry Holders

One of our best-selling pieces is this jewelry holder made with white tail deer sheds and forty year-old mesquite. The deer sheds come from all over, but that will be its own post, exclusively for y’all animal lovers. The mesquite, as I said, is about forty years-old. My dad had cut the wood when he was a teenager, and it survived the years. He found it recently, brought it back to their house, and cut it up into long, flat pieces. He makes knives and uses it in hilts and such.

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Making the holders started out as something for myself. I just wanted one. I don’t have a huge attachment to deer hunting, but I have gone before. Those are some of my fondest memories, and frankly, I think antlers are just great for decoration!

I’m thrilled that they are so popular, because they are nothing to make! Quick and easy. Let’s get started.

First, pick out your shed and your wood:

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Next, prep your picks (that’s fun to say). This takes a couple steps:

Take your shed, and sand the base down to where it stands up flat. Done.

Take your wood, and make it the length that you want. Make sure its dimensions are such that they’ll support the antler and whatever jewelry you put on it. In other words, make it a solid length and width.

Once it’s the size you want it to be, sand it on both sides as needed to make sure it rests flat and doesn’t wobble. No one likes wobbly things.

Now that your pieces have been cut and shaped, you need to treat and stylize your wood, and maybe even your antler, if you’d like. The wood, though, is a must. I use tung oil to brush on both sides of the wood. This is an important step. It protects the wood, and by doing it on both sides and the edges, you prevent cracking. Plus, it makes the wood pretty. You could make the antler shiny, but I don’t I like the more rugged, raw look to it. It maintains the integrity of the deer.

 

It is now time to assemble. Find where you’d like to mount to the antler. Be sure it’s in a place that the weight is well-distributed. Otherwise, your holder will fall over. Don’t want that.

Using a power drill, drill into the bottom of the wood part of the way. Place the base of the shed over that, and hold tight. Drill through the wood into the shed. Once it’s in, twist the shed with your hand till it’s on tight.

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Boom. You’ve got yourself a jewelry holder. Go dress it up now.

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May you stay inspired and crafty always, and God bless!

 

~Hannah ❤